“…the more we try to provide full security by interfering with the market system, the greater the insecurity becomes; and, what is worse, the greater becomes the contrast between the security of those to whom it is granted as a privilege and the ever-increasing insecurity of the under-privileged… As the number of the privileged increases and the difference between their security and the insecurity of the others increases, a completely new set of social values gradually arises. It is no longer independence but security which gives rank and status, the certain right to a pension more than confidence in his making good which makes a young man eligible for marriage, while insecurity becomes the dreaded state of the pariah in which those who in their youth have been refused admission to the haven of a salaried position remain for life.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 134.

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“The utter hopelessness of the position of those who, in a society which has thus grown rigid, are left outside the range of sheltered occupation, and the magnitude of the gulf which separates them from the fortunate possessor of jobs for whom protection against competition has made it unnecessary to budge ever so little to make room for those without can only be appreciated by those who have experienced it.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 133.

“Wherever communal action can mitigate disasters against which the individual can neither attempt to guard himself, nor make provision for the consequences, such communal action should undoubtedly be taken.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 125.

“It was not the Fascists but the socialists who began to collect children from the tenderest age into political organisations to make sure that they grew up as good proletarians. It was not the Fascists but the socialists who first thought of organising sports and games, football and hiking, in party clubs where the members would not be infected by other views. It was the socialists who first insisted that the party member should distinguish himself from others by the modes of greeting and the forms of address. It was they who by their organisation of “cells” and devices for the permanent supervision of private life created the prototype of the totalitarian party. Balilla and Hitlerjugend, Dopolavoro and Kraft durch Freude, political uniforms and military party formations, are all little more than imitations of older socialist institutions.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 118.

“…who will deny that a world in which the wealthy are powerful is still a better world than one in which only the already powerful can acquire wealth?” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 108.

“Although under competition the probability that a man who starts poor will reach great wealth is much smaller than is true of the man who has inherited property, it is not only possible for the former, but the competitive system is the only one where it depends solely on him and not on the favours of the mighty, and where nobody can prevent a man from attempting to achieve this result… Whether it is a question of changing his job or the place where he lives, of professing certain views or of spending his leisure in a particular manner, although sometimes the price he may have to pay for following his inclinations may be high, and to many appear too high, there are no absolute impediments, no dangers to bodily security and freedom that confine him by brute force to the task and the environment to which a superior has assigned him.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), pp. 106-107.

“It is often said that political freedom is meaningless without economic freedom. This is true enough, but in a sense almost opposite from that in which the phrase is used by our planners. The economic freedom which is the prerequisite of any other freedom cannot be the freedom from economic care which the socialists promise us and which can be obtained only by relieving the individual at the same time of the necessity and of the power of choice; it must be the freedom of our economic activity which, with the right of choice, inevitably also carries the risk and the responsibility of that right.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 104.

“That people should wish to be relieved of the bitter choice which hard facts often impose upon them is not surprising. But few want to be relieved through the choice being made for them by others. People just wish that the choice should not be necessary at all. And they are only too ready to believe that the choice is not really necessary, that it is imposed upon them merely by the particular economic system under which we live. What they resent is in truth that there is an economic problem.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 101.

“Nothing makes conditions more unbearable than the knowledge that no effort of ours can change them; and even if we should never have the strength of mind to make the necessary sacrifice, the knowledge that we could escape if we only strove hard enough makes many otherwise intolerable positions bearable.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 98.

“Because in modern society it is through the limitation of our money incomes that we are made to feel the restrictions which our relative poverty still imposes upon us, many have come to hate money as the symbol of these restrictions. But this is to mistake for the cause the medium through which a force makes itself felt. It would be much truer to say that money is one of the greatest instruments of freedom ever invented by man. It is money which in existing society opens an astounding range of choice to the poor man, a range greater than that which not many generations ago was open to the wealthy… If all rewards, instead of being offered in money, were offered in the form of public distinctions or privileges, positions of power over other men, or better housing or better food, opportunities for travel or education, this would merely mean that the recipient would no longer be allowed to choose, and that, whoever fixed the reward, determined not only its size but also the particular form in which it should be enjoyed.” – F. A. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom (New York: Routledge Classics, 1944/2001), p. 93.