“Once the concentration of non-whites reaches a certain level, whites cannot or will not live among them… “White flight” is a universal fact of American life. Liberals may deplore it, but no one can deny it.” – Jared Taylor, “If We Do Nothing,” American Renaissance, June 1996; If We Do Nothing: Essays and reviews from 25 years of white advocacy (New Century Books, 2017), p. 2.

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“Successful empire is seldom solely based on coercion; there must be some economic dividends for the ruled as well as the rulers, if only to buy the loyalty of indigenous elites, and these dividends need to be sustained for a significant length of time. The trouble with an empire in denial is that it tends to make two mistakes when it chooses to intervene in the affairs of lesser states. The first may be to allocate insufficient resources to the nonmilitary aspects of the project. The second, and the more serious, is to attempt economic and political transformation in an unrealistically short time frame.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 294.

“Only when the United States could cast itself in an anti-imperialist role – first against the British Empire during the Second World War and then (more wisely) against the Soviet Union during the cold war – were Americans able to perform their own cryptoimperial role with self-confidence. Even then, there were clear limits to American stamina. The doctrine of limited war led to a draw in Korea and a defeat in Vietnam. Contradictory commitments undermined U.S. predominance in the Middle East too. It took a succession of humanitarian disasters abroad in the 1990s and terrorist attacks at home in 2001 to rekindle public enthusiasm for a more assertive American foreign policy, though even this had to be cloaked in euphemism, its imperial character repeatedly denied.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 287.

“Traditionally, empires faced a choice between guns or butter – between military expenditures and consumption – and were constrained by excessive indebtedness. But the American empire needs consumption to fuel its economic growth, out of which its military expenditures can so easily be afforded. And it seems to be able to borrow unprecedented sums in order to maintain the growth of consumption. It is a guns and butter empire. [Emphasis not added].” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 267.

“The United States has nothing much to fear from either the widening or the deepening of the European Union – not least because the two processes stand in contradiction to each other. Talk of a federal Europe’s emerging as a counterweight to the United States is based on a complete misreading of developments. The EU is populous but senescent. Its economy is large but sluggish. Its productivity is not bad but vitiated by excessive leisure. It is a successful but still insufficiently liberal customs union. It contains a monetary union that has depressed rather than enhanced its members’ economic growth. It is certainly a legal union, but too much of its law emanates from an unelected and unaccountable commission for it to enjoy legitimacy. And as a political entity it seems likely to remain confederal for the foreseeable future.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 256.

“…the lesson of Britain’s imperial experience is clear: you simply cannot have an empire without imperialists – out there, on the spot – to run it.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 213.

“America’s brightest and best aspire not to govern Mesopotamia but to manage MTV; not to rule the Hejaz but to run a hedge fund. Unlike their British counterparts of a century ago, who left the elite British universities with an overtly imperial ethos, the letters ambitious young Americans would like to see after their names are CEO, not CBE [Commander of the Order of the British Empire].” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 204.

“…when the Americans say they come as liberators, not conquerors, they seem to mean it. If, as so many commentators claim, America is embarking on a new age of empire, it is shaping up to be the most ephemeral empire in all history. Other empire builders have fantasized about ruling subject peoples for a thousand years. This would seem to be history’s first thousand-day empire. It is not so much “lite” as disposable.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), pp. 203-204.

“…if there is one country in Africa for which the United States has a historic responsibility, it is Liberia… If liberal empire is a serious possibility in the twenty-first century, where better for it to begin its work than in wretched Liberia, a place where political independence has been a curse, not a blessing, and self-determination has turned out in practice to mean self-destruction?” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 199.

“The history of the fourteenth century would be incomprehensible without some knowledge of the bubonic plague, just as the conquest of the Americas by Europeans from the late fifteenth century until the mid-nineteenth would not have happened so easily without the export of infectious diseases, which more than decimated native populations. As well as infections, the conquistadors and colonists brought technology, institutions and ideas: gunpowder and the horse, Christianity and its various churches, West European notions of property, law and governance. Slow and erratic though it has been, the process of global democratization since the 1770s illustrates the way both institutions and ideas can be spread internationally as readily as goods can be traded across borders or money invested abroad.” – Niall Ferguson, Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (London: Penguin Books, 2005), p. 184.